Tagged: Hank Steinbrenner

Yes, Is Brian Cashman Available?…

New York Yankees GM Brian Cashman baseball executive

Mr Cashman, Dan Lozano is on Line 1…

And now we wait.

The Manny Caravan completed its tour yesterday with dinner last night in downtown Philadelphia at Royal Boucherie in Old City with Phillies executives.

royal-boucherie-2216

Rumors continue to swirl that Manny prefers the Yankees, but we all know at the end of the day, the team pulling up to Manny’s doorstep with the most Benjamins will be the winner. I have no clue how this is going to turn out. Many Yankee fans are confident he’ll be wearing Pinstripes while others feel it is a foregone conclusion that he’ll be calling the City of Brotherly Love home. The Chicago White Sox remain a strong possibility although I’d have to question why.  I know they have a strong farm system but a great network of prospects does not automatically equate to a World Series contender. Former top prospects Lucas Giolito and Yoan Moncada have not exactly set the World on fire. I know I’ll offend White Sox fans with this comment but I’ve always looked at the White Sox as a second class citizen compared to the Cubs when it comes to Chicago. Well, kind of the way I view the Mets.

I think as a baseball player, there is always sentimental attachments for your original team. Maybe that’s not true since I never played professional baseball but it seems to me that you’d be fond of the team you grew up with regardless where the Major League road may take you. With the Yankees, Manny would have multiple opportunities every year to play at Camden Yards.  Sure, the White Sox visit once a year and the Phillies might show up every three years in interleague play, but the Yankees and O’s have annual multiple home and away series as divisional foes. Opening Day at Yankee Stadium next season will bring the Manny-less Orioles to the Bronx.  Plus, there is the added incentive of staying in Baseball’s best division after a brief hiatus and World Series visit in the NL West. If you want to know how great the AL East is, just follow Marcus Stroman on Twitter. I hear he’s been tweeting up a storm about it.

Capture

The Phillies are a fine organization and I personally enjoy the City of Philadelphia. When I was younger, I worked across from Independence Hall and used to love the history within the city during my walks through the streets of downtown Philly. But c’mon, nothing compares to the bright lights, big city of New York. Putting the money aside, I feel the attraction of New York City and the history and tradition of the Yankees places them head and shoulders above the White Sox and Phillies. Regardless of Manny’s ultimate decision, he’s going to make more money than he’ll ever need. Imagine having so much money you could live anywhere you want.  In the United States, it would have to be NYC for me.  I love Los Angeles and San Francisco but nothing compares to the Big Apple.

1b0f168a65a0905f12043f639fca2d62

We know the Yankees have the money to make an offer to Manny that he cannot refuse. But times have changed under Managing General Partner Hal Steinbrenner. A bean counter by education, he’s so much more conservative than his father. I’ve often wondered how much influence Hank Steinbrenner has on his brother since they are Co-Chairpersons of the Yankees. Somehow, I get an image of Hank sitting in the board room saying, “F’ it!  Let’s sign both Harper and Machado!”. Or at least I hope that’s what he is saying even if the Steinbrenner Family would never allow it. I guess we should say the Steinbrenner Siblings now with a hat tip to the departed Joan Steinbrenner.

I don’t blame the Yankees for not making an offer to Patrick Corbin after the Washington Nationals blew away the field with their six-year, $140 million contract to snag the left-hander. But there’s a big difference between Corbin and Manny Machado. Corbin may have been the best free agent pitcher, but he’s certainly not elite and he is far from a sure thing. Manny is one of the best players in MLB, as is Bryce Harper. No, they’re not Mike Trout but then again who is?  Well, I guess that would be Mike Trout. But aside from baseball’s best player, Machado and Harper reign supreme. Regardless of whether you give them 8 or 10 years, these are guys who will still be performing at the back end of their contracts. Like I heard someone say, this is not like getting a 36-year old Robinson Cano with five years left on his massive contract. Rare is the opportunity to grab a potential future Hall of Famer for only money. This is not about paying huge dollars for past performance, this is compensation for the best yet to come. Sign Machado.  Sign Harper. I really don’t care which one. Just do it, Hal.

Manny enjoys the role of the villain. Actually, thinking about it, I feel it would help deflect some of the heat off Giancarlo Stanton. Stanton crushed the baseball last year in Pinstripes and was still booed unmercifully at times.  Shift the focus to Manny.  I think the guy would eat it up. Manny, despite his Miami roots, was made for the Main Stage in New York.

USATSI_10988185.48de8757.fill-735x490
Photo Credit: USA TODAY Sports (Bill Streicher)

I know the Yankees have been working hard behind the scenes, but we can’t really see the efforts from the outside looking in. I really wish the Yankees would make the moves to shore up the bullpen before all the best options are gone. It was tough to see Andrew Miller sign earlier today to play with Chasen Shreve in St. Louis. I get the injury and age concerns with Miller but he remains one of my favorite Yankees in recent memory and I would have loved a reunion in Pinstripes. I didn’t really want Joakim Soria but the Yankees were slightly connected to him earlier in the off-season. He represented one of the cheaper options on the market with the potential to help, but he’s now gone as the Oakland A’s scooped him up last night. I really want one of David Robertson, Adam Ottavino or Zach Britton. I am losing confidence the Yankees will re-sign D-Rob and fear that we’ll see him in a Red Sox uniform in the not-so-distant future. I had a dream last night which featured D-Rob wearing that ugly “B” cap on the mound at Fenway Park. I guess you could call the dream a “nightmare”.  Ottavino, a New Yorker, would easily assimilate onto MLB’s biggest stage, and I think Britton will be much closer to his dominant 2016 self as he distances himself from the recent series of injuries. Give me one and get him now! I’d love two of them but I recognize that the second may need to be an under-the-radar type with potential (i.e., “cheap”).

I’d love to see the Yankees do something before we hit the lull between Christmas and New Year’s. I know, they’re working hard and there is so much we can’t see.  After all this watering, I’d love to see a little fruit. Hey Hal, throw us bone! We want to dethrone the Boston Red Sox but we need your help. It’s only money. Come on, brother, it’s Christmas. Please give to those of us less fortunate.

Capture2

As always, Go Yankees!

Advertisements

Sticks and Stones may break my bones…

Some words are better left unsaid…

I was disappointed that the Yankees could not reach agreement with Dellin Betances before proceeding with the arbitration hearings.  It’s never good when a player has to sit in a room to hear about his faults.  It’s hard to walk away without some residual adverse impact.  Once it was determined there was no common ground, the Yankees cannot be faulted for allowing the arbitration to proceed.  It is just a very unfortunate situation.

harperdellin19s-1-web

Credit:  Andrew Savulich, The New York Daily News

The Yankees, based on prior arbitration cases, were probably fairly confident they would prevail.    The gap of $2 million may not have seemed to be great, but in terms of the dollars it could eventually cost the Yankees on new deals with Betances or the precedent it would have set could have been very costly in the grand scheme of things.

Yet, it was absolutely out of line for Yankees President Randy Levine to gloat after the arbitrators announced Betances would be paid the Yankees offer of $3 million rather than his request for $5 million.  Levine’s comments that Dellin’s $5 million request was “over the top” and “not based on reality” were unnecessary and ultimately inflammatory.  If Betances had any lingering hard feelings before, they’ve multiplied.  Given Levine’s extensive background in Labor Law, I am very surprised that he’d make those type of comments.  The words do seem out of character for a Labor attorney.  I’ve never been a big fan of Levine’s but it’s hard to dismiss his accomplishments which included work at the U.S. Department of Justice during the Reagan administration, former Labor Commissioner for New York City, and MLB’s chief labor negotiator during the negotiations for the 1996 MLB Labor Agreement.

So, maybe that’s why the unnecessary words that Levine spoke yesterday hurt even more.  He, more than anyone, should have known better.  There was no value in attacking Dellin’s attorneys, and the long-term impact is only harmful.  If Dellin eventually walks away when free agency arrives, we’ll be able to look back at this day as the first nail in the coffin.

There are some guys in the Yankees executive management team that you want to keep away from talking to the media.  Yankees co-owner Hank Steinbrenner is one, but you can certainly add Levine to the list.  Levine has been the Yankees president since 2000 but maybe it’s time to bring in a younger, more open-minded replacement.  If I owned the Yankees, I would probably promote Brian Cashman to President, Baseball Operations, hire a new general manager, and show Levine the door.

Goose being Goose…

Every spring, Rich “Goose” Gossage shows up and makes statements that sound like he’s been smoking too much weed in Colorado.  His remarks in training camp that he cannot be compared to “one inning” closers like Aroldis Chapman and Mariano Rivera was absurd to say the least.

Nevertheless, I felt Brian Cashman’s comments were perfect when he said that he had more important things to think about like drinking his cup of coffee and working on his tan.  That’s exactly how I take anything Goose has to say.

I loved the guy when he was the Yankees closer, and he was arguably my favorite Yankee (after the unfortunate loss of the beloved Thurman Munson).

Goose is only trying to draw reactions with his words.  He played during a different time, and it’s very hard to compare the challenges he faced in the 70’s and 80’s to modern times.  The game has evolved.  Despite nearly 500 more career innings than Rivera, Goose had barely more than half of the total career saves.  Goose was a great Yankee for 6 years.  Rivera was a great Yankee for 19 years.  Rivera’s number (42) would have been retired even if MLB hadn’t retired the number league-wide for the great Jackie Robinson.  Last time I checked, Goose’s number (54) is neatly placed on the back of current closer Aroldis Chapman.

Goose just needs to enjoy his time in Florida before he hops on a plane to travel back to his favorite Cannabis shop in Colorado Springs…

–Scott

The Mets must be New York’s team…

We’re mediocre and we like it!…

I fully understand why the Yankees can’t field a starting rotation full of $25 million per year starters.  I recognize that Max Scherzer is most likely cost prohibitive for even the rich Yankees.  But my problem is the off-season of inactivity has me concerned about the prospects for 2015.  I am glad the Yankees signed lefty reliever Andrew Miller and re-signed starting third baseman Chase Headley, but as it stands, the Yankees are not a better team today than the one who finished with 84 wins last season.  Miller’s addition was offset by closer David Robertson’s departure, and Headley is a returnee.

Other guys who helped make a difference last year, like Brandon McCarthy and Francisco Cervelli, are no longer Yankees.  The Yankees were wise not to pay McCarthy $48 million for four years, but he will still be missed.  Cervelli brought lefty specialist Justin Wilson to the team and he’ll help in the bullpen, but it remains to be seen if John Ryan Murphy or Austin Romine can match his intensity as Brian McCann’s backup.

It’s difficult watching other teams make bold moves to improve while the Yankees sit idly by.  If the Yankees are not in on Scherzer, then why are they not pursuing guys like Kris Medlen.  Medlen was a very talented pitcher before he got hurt.  There’s risk for the Kansas City Royals in signing Medlen today, however, there’s also very good upside potential.  The Yankees’ preference was to re-sign #5 starter Chris Capuano who failed in Boston and was considering Japan when the Yankees called.

If the Yankees had a strong farm system with the upper levels stacked with major league ready talent it would be one thing, but that’s not the case.  The best talent are years away from helping.

Honestly, if the Yankees are not going to try to win, I’d prefer to see them blow the team up and send the trade-able players away for quality prospects.  A few 95 loss seasons for the chance to return to prominence would be preferable to an annual 85 win team that consistently comes up short in September.

Or better yet, I’d prefer to see the Steinbrenner family sell the team to someone who shares the understanding that George Steinbrenner had about the importance of successful Yankee teams.

The Yankees are not going to win with the current roster.  Paying Alex Rodriguez nearly $30 million per year for the next three years has, so it seems, to have paralyzed the team’s finances.  Mediocrity courtesy of A-Rod.

It’s almost comical when I hear players like Andrew Miller say that he joined the Yankees to win.  With Team Mediocrity, the only winning he’ll see is going to the bank to deposit his paychecks.

Right now, the Yankees fan base seems very lethargic and disappointed.  Maybe that’s just me, but the fan base needs to be energized.  Management needs to do something to show the nation they are committed to being successful in 2015.  We need something to energize us.  I am not sure what it would take, but anything is better than nothing.  Pinning your hopes on the good health of CC Sabathia, Mark Teixeira and others is simply a suicide mission.

There’s still time for the Steinbrenner boys to show Major League Baseball that they are still the Yankees.  But each day of inactivity brings us closer to the inevitable season of disappointment.  It’s funny, the person who may pay the price ultimately is manager Joe Girardi.  If the Yankees continue the downward spiral, someone will have to be held accountable.  Somehow, I don’t think it will be Hal or Hank Steinbrenner.

George, we miss you.

–Scott

I so want to be wrong!…

 

The right to be pessimistic…

Anybody who has read my blog knows that I have been very pessimistic about the 2013 Yankees.  I didn’t feel right about the team coming out of training camp as the Yankees did nothing to upgrade the talent on the team and then when the season started, it became a comedy watching all of the regulars, well, for the most part, end with significant time on the disabled list.

A slight bit of optimism started to slip into my thinking last week when the Yankees started inching closer to the second wild card slot.  But that was quickly dashed by the weekend sweep at the hands of the AL East leading Boston Red Sox.  The Yankees weren’t just defeated in the series, they felt like a minor league team against giants.  It “felt” as though it was impossible for the Yankees to take charge of a game and even when they did hold a lead, it seemed very fragile and in retrospect, it was.

I was reading Joel Sherman’s recent column about the bleak prospect for 2014 and I have to agree.  CC Sabathia has shown nothing to lead one to believe that he’ll restore his status as the team’s ace.  It is very possible that we are watching the final pinstripe days for Hiroki Kuroda who has been the team’s best pitcher.  Ivan Nova, after a brief successful run, has shown he is nothing more than a roller-coaster.  Phil Hughes is auditioning for his job elsewhere next season and not doing a very good job.  I do not see any scenario that brings Andy Pettitte back for another season.  I am sure that this one has been a grind and at his age, that’s enough to pack his bags and head back home to the Lone Star State for the final time.  He’ll be a spring training regular as an instructor, I am sure, but as for Yankee Stadium starts, the end is near.  I honestly have no clue what season’s rotation will look like other than CC anchoring the bottom end.

As much as I want to see the return of Robinson Cano, I don’t want the Yankees to break the bank.  It’s that type of mentality that led them to their current predicament.  But I recognize when Hal and Hank Steinbrenner make comments that there’s a limit to what they’ll spend (even if it is the right thing to do), it will psychologically send a message to Cano that maybe they don’t want him as bad as the crosstown Mets or the ‘spend-foolishly’ Los Angeles Angels.  The outfield is a disaster with the cast of characters that can call themselves the “Forty-Something” Club.  Granted, Brett Gardner isn’t 40, but he’s also proven that he is DL-prone.  That’s not an affliction that gets better with age.  We’ll most likely see the return of Vernon Wells for no other reason than he won’t cost the Yankees anything toward the salary cap.  Derek Jeter is a Hall of Famer, but as a 40-year-old shortstop playing on a bad ankle, he’s not a guy that you want to see on the field for 140 or 150 games.  Mark Teixeira is on the express train to insignificance.  Chris Stewart has done a decent job as the replacement for Russell Martin, but he’s a backup on almost any other club.

A look at the Yankees’ farm system does not show anyone that is ready to be handed a first class ticket to the Bronx.  This is definitely an organization in a state of flux, and I am not convinced that it is one that GM Brian Cashman can survive.  I think the Yankees will bring back Joe Girardi (there’s not really anyone else that stands out as a surefire upgrade) and someone has to pay the price for Hal Steinbrenner’s frugalness.  Cashman’s mantra was building the farm system, but as it stands today, it is a system filled with overhyped prospects with the best talent years from maturing.

How do the Yankees overhaul their aging, overpaid and underperforming roster?  Boston’s GM Ben Cherington gets great credit for his salary purge last year that led to his team being on the fast track to the World Series.  Unfortunately, I do not see any other team willing to accept the Yankees’ excess baggage.  Are we facing a 1980’s drought? I hope not, but then again, I am not seeing anything that would instill confidence.  I hope the team’s off-season meetings are about how to improve the team and not to avoid exceeding the 2014 salary cap.  Another 2013-like year, and this is going to be a very difficult hole to dig out of.  I would not expect the Yankees to compete again until after the contracts of Alex Rodriguez, Mark Teixeira, Derek Jeter, CC Sabathia, and the other older vets are distant memories.

Meanwhile, my favorite NFL team, the Minnesota Vikings, is 0-2.  2013 is not playing out to be a very good sports year for me.  I need help.  Hey, San Jose Sharks, can you do something to lift my spirits?…

The end is near for the Yankees but sadly that also means….

The end of the legendary career of my personal favorite Yankee, Mariano Rivera.  He’s been my favorite since he was zooming fastballs in the 8th inning prior to the entrance of closer John Wetteland.  Mo has been the epitome of the ideal baseball player.  When I think of all the Yankee greats, there is some sadness that I never got to see them play, like the Iron Horse, Lou Gehrig.  But in Mariano Rivera, I saw a pitcher that my grandchildren will be talking about.  I’ve been very proud of his career and accomplishments and even in those moments of failure, there was never sadness because you knew that Mo gave it his all.  It’s been a pleasure to be a fan during his reign and his career will always be one that I’ll be so thankful and happy for.   I thought his words in the Fenway Park dugout were sincere, simple and so-Mo.  He is and has been the best…

BUQSMenIUAAWxTf

–Scott

 

Looking forward to A-Rod’s “Going Away” Party!…

 

He’s a fraud but wait for the hearing…

My position on Alex Rodriguez has not changed.  I do not like A-Rod, the player, and I do not respect “A-Fraud”, the man.  I am anxious for him to begin serving his suspension as he represents everything that is wrong about baseball.  But I have to side with those who think the actions of Ryan Dempster to throw at A-Rod in a recent Red Sox-Yankees game was wrong.  The players do not have the right to be the judge, jury and executioner.  There is a process and A-Fraud is properly following his right to appeal.  It is unfortunate that an actual hearing is so far off, but it is what it is.  At the end of the day, A-Fraud will be suspended and he’ll be banned from games while those currently serving their 50-game suspensions have returned and hopefully have learned from their past mistakes.

Each day that A-Fraud plays, it sickens me.  It bothers me that with each home run, he inches ever so closely to the great Willie Mays in career home run totals.  A-Fraud will never be the man that Willie Mays is, and I will never recognize A-Fraud as a better home run hitter or player for that matter than Mays.  Alex Rodriguez is where he is in career stats because he cheated.  He was fortunate that the rules of baseball, at least those written, did not prohibit him from his actions for the majority of his younger days.  But morally, he was wrong then and legally, he is wrong now.

I am not sure what the 2014 Yankees will look like with A-Fraud on the sidelines (assuming that he serves his full 211-game suspension).  But then again, that’s for GM Brian Cashman and the Steinbrenner family to figure out.  As much as I wanted him to succeed, Kevin Youkilis is not the answer.  Maybe as a role player, but not as the starting third baseman.  The Yankees are in trouble if they are forced to use a mix of Jayson Nix and Eduardo Nunez.

The Boston Red Sox got better quickly because they were able to blow up the roster and unload some heavy, excess baggage.  The Yankees really need to do the same thing, but of course, the opportunity may not be there.  I am not sure that 2013 has been Brian Cashman’s best year, and it’s always possible that the Steinbrenner family moves in a different direction this off-season.  Cashman’s inability to bring anything more than cast-off’s from other rosters to the team could be directly the fault of the Steinbrenners.  But they are not going to sever ways with themselves.  It would not surprise me at all to see Cashman in some place like Seattle next season.

I’ve missed Soriano’s excitement…

Alfonso Soriano may look and act like an old man next season, but for this season, he has been one of the few bright spots.  I have enjoyed to see his resurgence in the Bronx, and he is very deserving of the accolades that he has received.  While I want to see Soriano back next season, it is time for the organization to begin making some hard decisions on the older players.  Plus, they need to “fatten” CC Sabathia back up again (okay, just kidding, but there might to something to the belief that the change in weight has adversely impacted his mechanics).  I don’t think there is an easy solution on how to re-build the Yankees quickly.  There are too many holes and not enough major league ready talent in the farm system.

The Yankees should be free to catch the season premiere of “The Walking Dead”…

I still do not believe the Yankees will make the play-offs this year.  The hill is too steep and they just do not have the pieces to pull off a September charge to chase down the other wild card contenders.  As I wrote this post, the Yankees lost to the team that they have generally beaten this season, the Toronto Blue Jays.  The Jays were up 6-0 after 2 innings so it was clear that it was not going to be their night.  But it was worse that the Yankees had arguably their best pitcher on the mound in Hiroki Kuroda.  This game is a microcosm of the season.  The Yankees have built too large of a hole to overcome.

 

–Scott

 

 

 

When a move that had to be made, is made…

Thank you, Merci, Gracias, Grazie, Danke, ありがとう

Yes, I admit it, I was worried that starting pitcher Hiroki Kuroda was either going to sign with the Los Angeles Dodgers or head back to Japan to pursue his stated intent to finish his career in his home country.  Pulling Kuroda out of the Yankees rotation was not a promising thought.  Given CC Sabathia’s recent minor surgery, it is no sure thing that he’ll be Mister King of the Hill when the season rolls around.  After CC, there is nothing but question marks.  As it stands, the rotation would be Sabathia, Kuroda, Phil Hughes, Ivan Nova and David Phelps.  Nothing against the latter three, but all of them carry their own questions and concerns.  The Yankees are not going after a prize free agent pitcher, so they would have been left to try and find a diamond in the rough.  Fortunately, that’s no longer a concern, particularly if the Yankees get a return engagement from Andy Pettitte.

In the back of mind, I did feel that Kuroda would stay in New York due to a sense of unfinished business.  In his final season with the Los Angeles Dodgers, I remember he had veto power on trades and he made a comment that he wanted to finish the season with the guys he started the year with.  He struck me as a loyal and honorable player with those remarks, and despite rumors he left money on the table from other prospective clubs, he made the decision to return to New York on a one-year, $15 million deal.  This may be his second and final season with the Yankees, but he’s certainly proven to me that he has a great deal of integrity with a genuine respect for the game which places him among the upper echelon of guys who have put on the pinstripes.

Thanks, but don’t let the door hit you on the way out…

As for the other two notable Yankee free agents (Rafael Soriano and Nick Swisher), I am indifferent about who they sign with.  I would prefer to see neither player sign with an AL East club, but then again, they have to find the best deal for them wherever that may be.  I saw some speculation that the Boston Red Sox might go after Swisher, but after their signing of former Oakland A’s outfielder Jonny Gomes today, I wonder if it lessens their interest in Swish.  I am concerned about right field, but I have to trust that GM Brian Cashman has a plan.  His trade for Swisher a few years ago was inspired, and I am sure they’ve scoped the league for players who are long on talent but have underperformed to this point.  Logan Morrison of the Miami Marlins is one player who immediately comes to mind.

Player most likely to replace A-Rod during the inevitable DL stint…

Once we get past Thanksgiving and to the Baseball Winter Meetings, we should start to get a better idea of what the Yankees game plan for 2013 looks like.  I am sure that there will be late moves in January or early February, but at some point, the Yankees have to do something to improve their roster.  Complacency in the AL East will only buy you last place.

There hasn’t been much talk about catching, but I wonder who’ll be the backstop in 2013.  Russell Martin has not been a priority so the potential increases every day that someone steps forward with a reasonable offer that entices Martin to bite.  I get the sense that if he is healthy, Austin Romine may see some time behind the plate.  It’s too bad Gary Sanchez is still so far away in the minor leagues.

Hello, again…

I was surprised to see the Toronto Blue Jays bring back former manager John Gibbons, but then again, they brought back Cito Gaston for a second tour of duty (when he replaced Gibbons a few years ago).  Gibbons must be jazzed about getting control of his old team combined with the influx of great talent through the trade with the Marlins that brought Jose Reyes, Mark Buehrle, Josh Johnson and Emilio Bonificio to Ontario.  Of course that adds pressure to the job due the increased expectations.  I was still surprised that the Jays didn’t try to keep Torey Lovullo (who followed John Farrell to Boston) given the recent trend to go with younger, unproven managers (ala Robin Ventura, Don Mattingly, Walt Weiss, Mike Redmond, etc.).  Not that Gibbons is old (he is only 50), but he does kind of have that ‘been there, done that’ stigma attached to him.

Why did I tell Boston to shove it?…

Speaking of the Marlins, I wonder how their new hitting coach Tino Martinez feels about the team now.  He signed with the Marlins just prior to the blockbuster trade, so the roster looks completely different now than it did when he joined Miami.  He’ll have his work cut out for him as the Marlins unveil a largely unknown roster when play resumes in April.

Hal, Rupert Murdoch on Line 1…

Now that the News Corporation has acquired a 49% stake in the YES Network, I wonder how much influence Rupert Murdoch will have on the Steinbrenner family.  The YES Network is dependent upon the success of the Yankees, and if Hal’s imposed budgetary constraints on the Yankees result in diminished performance, how loud does Murdoch become?  People will not pay premium dollars to watch a 70-win team on the field.  The Steinbrenner family insists this is not a prelude to the possible sale of the Yankees, but then again, Hal and Hank were always reluctant to join the team’s management when their dad was alive and healthy.  For years, it seemed like a Steinbrenner son-in-law had more interest than a blood-born Steinbrenner (outside of George, of course).  If someone told me that I could make billions, I am sorry but I’d have to let go of my affection for the Yankees.  If Hal is so focused on the bottom line, I believe that inevitably he’ll seek to cash out when the team is at an optimum potential sales price.

The next couple of years will be very pivotal years for the Yankees franchise.

Who died and made you George Steinbrenner?…

The Los Angeles Dodgers remain my second favorite team (otherwise known as my favorite National League team), but I maintain my reservations that they want to become the new “Yankees”.  It is not outside of the realm of possibility that they’ll surpass the Yankees in total annual salaries.  Yes, I am tired of simply buying players.  I do like the good old fashioned trade to help subsidize home-grown talent.  For years, that was the Dodgers’ business model and it is one that has helped propel the San Francisco Giants to two World Championships in three years.  I remain a devout Don Mattingly fan, but I hope that the organization is not creating expectations so great that Donnie Baseball can’t survive.  Then again, there is the scenario that the Yankees and Dodgers regress, and both Joe Girardi and Mattingly are fired, setting up the potential return to New York for the now experienced manager Mattingly.

I want to wish everyone a very happy and enjoyable Thanksgiving!  May it be a time of peace, joy, and robust memories for all of you and your respective families.  Of course, in Dallas, it will only be memorable if the Cowboys win, but everywhere else, I hope everyone is grateful and thankful for life and what life has to offer.  Be well and enjoy!…

–Scott

Home Field Advantage doesn’t help when you can’t get home…

 

A funny thing happened on the way to the World Series…

While the Yankees have gotten good starting pitching, the one thing I knew they lacked will most likely be the reason that they will find themselves, once again, on the sidelines.  Timely, clutch hitting.  For whatever reason, when the Yankees bats go silent, bad things happen.  After they were ousted last year by the Detroit Tigers, I felt the team needed to find some dependable, productive bats to help kickstart the offense during those lulls.  The weakness does not get overly exposed in the course of a 162-game season, but in a short 7-game series, it most certainly does (particularly when your opponent is able to put baseball’s best on the mound for one or two appearances).

The Yankees made a few minor moves in the off-season, but nothing to help enhance the offense.  Yes, they signed Raul Ibanez and he has had some great at-bat’s this post-season.  But face it, he is not the player he was a few years ago with the Philadelphia Phillies.  Ichiro Suzuki has been a positive but he was merely a replacement for what the Yankees had in Brett Gardner until he was injured.

When Robinson Cano is not hitting, there’s no one on the team that is capable of carrying the team on his back.  A-Rod’s best days are clearly in the rear view mirror.  Nick Swisher is a classic example of hot/cold, and Mark Teixeira is certainly not the feared slugger he used to be.

As I write this post, the Yankees trail the Detroit Tigers in the ALCS, 2 games to none.  They are down 2-0 in the 5th, and Phil Hughes has left the game with a back injury.  Justin Verlander is the opposing pitcher (and the aforementioned “baseball’s best”).  The mountain the Yankees have to climb seems impossible from my vantage point.  Prove me wrong, I’d love it.  But the Yankees hitters just do not match up well against Detroit’s pitchers.  I was enjoying it earlier in the season when it looked like the Chicago White Sox might win their division, but they faded and allowed the team I feared most to make the play-offs.  Well, I feared the Tampa Bay Rays too, but started their late season rally too late.

Maybe Cherington was right to the blow up his roster…

The Yankees cannot go into the upcoming off-season with status quo in mind.  With Alex Rodriguez’s contract now becoming a huge albatross, what can the team do to overcome?  Derek Jeter had a great season until his ankle injury derailed him.  Can he put up another successful campaign next year.  I wouldn’t bet against him, but the realist in me knows that he’ll be a 39-year old shortstop.  At some point, the skills do start to erode.  If the Yankees decide that Robinson Cano is not worth a behemoth contract, how do they fill second?  At what point does Mark Teixeira become a liability?  Those long, slow starts are becoming longer and slower as the years go by.  All those questions and we havn’t even gotten out of the infield.

The Yankees and GM Brian Cashman have many difficult decisions ahead.  Putting the 2003 All-Star Team on the field is not the answer.  We need the 2013 or 2014 All-Star Team!  Okay, that’s not realistic, but the Yankees need players with talent, ability and lots of upside.  And, oh yeah, lots and lots of pitching.

George, are you there?…

Given that Hank Steinbrenner’s fingerprints were on the re-signing of Alex Rodriguez, maybe the first action of the off-season should be to neuter Hank and leave the critical decisions to Hal Steinbrenner.  Or better yet, seek a medium (is John Edward available?) to consult with the spirit of George Steinbrenner.

It’s disappointing to watch the Yankees underperform on their way to a quick exit from the ALCS.  Every divisional series went 5 games, and the NLCS has some fire to it.  Meanwhile, the Yankees choke.  C’mon, prove me wrong, I dare you…

 

–Scott