Do it again, only better…

The Apology…

When I heard today that Yankees owner Hal Steinbrenner had apologized to Yankee fans for the 2014 season, it did bring back memories of when the Yankees lost to the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1981 World Series and George Steinbrenner’s famed apology.

It’s tough to criticize ownership because they did spend money in the off-season to bring in Jacoby Ellsbury, Carlos Beltran, Brian McCann and others.  However, it was a flawed team from the start.  Even in April, when the starting rotation was still healthy, the infield looked to be a disaster with question marks around the bases.  The gaping hole created by Robinson Cano’s departure was never sufficiently addressed although Martin Prado was a good late season pickup.

With Mark Teixeira’s injuries in recent years, it was no sure thing that he’d bounce back after last year’s wrist surgery.  He was never the same player and may never be again.  Third base was poorly addressed with Kelly Johnson, particularly when considered in tandem with the hole at second base and the diminished skills, thanks to age, of the legendary shortstop.

I am not sure what moves the Yankees could have made that would have worked out better.  GM Brian Cashman was dealing with limited options last off-season and it is why they had to throw money at the situation.  Sadly, it’s not the 20-something, in the middle of your prime, guys that are routinely available.  It’s the aging veterans or the journeymen.

Via LoHud Yankees Blog

One of the guys who had been tied to the Yankees last off-season was second baseman Omar Infante.  Infante subsequently spurned the Yankees for the Kansas City Royals, and in retrospect, he made the perfect decision as his team has advanced to the AL Divisional Play-offs.  It is in what Infante saw regarding the Yankees situation that needs to be fixed.

Now that Alex Rodriguez is back, I hope that does not prevent the Yankees from bringing back Chase Headley.  Straight up, I’d take Headley at third over Rodriguez.  There’s going to be a huge fight for the DH spot next year with Beltran and A-Rod.  If Beltran is healthy, I’d give him the edge so this team may simply have no spot for A-Rod (which is what I would like to see).  I know the Yankees still owe A-Rod a great deal of money, but they’d be best served paying the majority of his contract to move him elsewhere (the proverbial “addition by subtraction”).

The first order of business for Yankee ownership is to re-sign Cashman.  All reports indicate that’s going to happen, but I’d prefer to see it happen before the end of the World Series so that the GM is not a distraction at the start of the Hot Stove League.  If anybody needs to be “all in”, it’s Cashman.

Typical Derek Jeter…

I was convinced all season long that there was no way Jeter could top Mariano Rivera’s 2013 farewell.  But I should have never underestimated him.  The game went from frustrating when David Robertson gave up the potential game winning lead to exhilaration when Derek hit the game winning, walk off single in the bottom of the 9th in his final Yankee Stadium appearance.  It was an incredible experience to watch.  The fans in attendance at the Stadium certainly got their money’s worth.

New York Times

At first, I was surprised when I heard that Jeter had no desire to play shortstop during the final series in Boston.  But I completely get his reasons for wanting to take something away from the final Yankee Stadium appearance.  By the end, Jeter was a guy ready to lay down his glove but he left the field with the same class and dignity as when he arrived.  Tough to see Jeter go, but it was time.  I saw the quotes that said ‘don’t be sad that it’s over, be glad that it happened’ and they are so true.  We were blessed to have Derek Jeter, but now it is time for somebody else.

So long, Derek.  Looking forward to the retirement of your number at Yankee Stadium and entry into the Hall of Fame.

–Scott

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